Location

  • Grandview Lookout Tower to South Kaibab Trailhead

Length

  • 22.5 miles

Southern Trailhead: Grandview Lookout Tower

Access

Follow Grand Canyon National Park’s Rim Drive (AZ 64) to its southernmost dip, about 11 miles east of Grand Canyon Village. From this junction, follow FR 310 (Coconino Rim Drive) 1.3 miles south to the trailhead.


Northern Trailhead: South Kaibab Trailhead

Access

There is no overnight parking or camping at the trailhead. You must take a shuttle from Grand Canyon Village, near the intersection of US 180 and AZ 64. Information is available within the Park Guide you’ll receive at the entrance kiosk, and also at the Visitor Center.


Trail Route Description

This passage begins at the Grandview Lookout Tower and starts out on the Tusayan Bike Trail heading west. It works its way through the forest, drops into a drainage and reaches Watson Tank. Now on forest roads, the route turns to the north and joins FR 303. It becomes singletrack, works its way over to the junction with FR 303D and turns to the north on this road. When it comes to the end of FR 303D, the route becomes singletrack again, passes Upper Ten X Tank, goes through a gate and then joins FR 2710B. It follows this road to FR 2710 and then turns on to FR 9122E. It follows this road, passes a junction with FR 2709, and comes to Coconino Wash. It turns northwest and follows Bike Route 3 and then 2, which leads to Bike Route 1. The route curves to the north behind the town of Tusayan. A short climb and descent leads to a road junction and a turn to the west. The trail goes under Highway 64 and turns north. The Tusayan Bike Trail (which the AZT follows) ends 0.3-mile north of Tusayan. From that point the AZT is signed across the old Moqui Lodge area, about 0.5-mile to the GCNP boundary fence. From the gate the route is signed all the way to the South Kaibab Trailhead. After entering the park the route joins the paved Greenway Trail, crosses Vann Drive, and continues north paralleling Highway 64. The Greenway passes a trail to Mather Campground and Grand Canyon Village as well as another trail to the Visitor Center. After turning to the east on a powerline road the route crosses Highway 64. It follows this road for just over a mile, crosses Highway 64 again, and then follows the powerline corridor up along Yaki Point to the South Kaibab Trailhead.


Difficulty

  • Easy to Moderate

Season(s)


Water

Water is available in Tusayan and the Grand Canyon Village. Water may also be available in the stock tanks along the trail and seasonally in some of the drainages the trail crosses.


Notes/Warnings:

  • All water found in creeks and springs on this passage should be purified prior to use.
  • There is a fee for entering Grand Canyon National Park. Contact the park service for details.

Resources

  • USGS Topographic Maps: Grandview Point, Tusayan East and Phantom Ranch
  • Kaibab National Forest map
  • Grand Canyon National Park map
  • BLM Information Center maps
  • Section Hiking article by Abigail Kessler

For more information


Current Passage Info

US House of Representatives Passes Grand Canyon Protection Act

US House of Representatives Passes Grand Canyon Protection Act

The Grand Canyon Protection Act passed the U.S House of Representatives today! This important conservation legislation would protect the Arizona Trail from dangerous uranium mining north and south of Grand Canyon National Park. Thank you, Congressman Raul Grijalva, and all Representatives who voted in favor of the Act (Gallego, Kirkpatrick, O'Halleran, Stanton). Now, it’s on to the Senate. Please encourage your Senators to protect public lands, water sources, indigenous rights, wildlife, and Arizona’s outdoor recreation economy by voting in support of the Grand Canyon Protection Act. With support from Arizona Senators Sinema and Kelly, we are hopeful to see this signed into law soon.
Read More

AZT Passage 37: Starting out at Grand Canyon’s South Rim

The Trek (December 22, 2020) by Abigail Kessler Though it’s listed as the South Rim section of the trail, this passage mostly takes you through Kaibab National Forest and the back ways of Grand Canyon National Park, only occasionally hinting at the chasm to come. There’s plenty to enjoy about the trip, however– as well as a number of options for detours. And when you’ve reached the northern end you’ll be left looking down over the rim of the Grand Canyon. Basic Info Length: 22.5 miles, one way Expected Completion Time: One day (if thru-hiking at a pace of 20-30 miles/day) 4-5 days (if day-hiking 4-6 miles/day) Location: South Kaibab Trailhead in GCNP to Tusayan Ranger District (roughly 15 miles east of GCNP visitor’s center on E Hwy 64 and 2 miles south from there). Maps are available on the Arizona Trail Association website. Trail Type: Out and Back, though it does partially follow a few looped trails in the Tusayan Bike System Scenery: Pinon and ponderosa pine forests with the occasional stone ledge, views of the Grand Canyon toward the end Terrain: Easy. The hills are for the most part gentle and the trail is clear. Navigation: For most of this section, the AZT is a well-marked...
Read More
Ask Arizona’s Senators to Support the Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act

Ask Arizona’s Senators to Support the Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act

Please join the Arizona Trail Association in urging Senator Martha McSally to protect Grand Canyon by co-sponsoring the Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act (S.3127). The bill, which already passed the House in a bi-partisan manner, was introduced in the U.S. Senate late last year by Senator Kyrsten Sinema. The Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act would protect over 1 million acres surrounding Grand Canyon National Park from new uranium mining by making permanent an existing but temporary 20-year moratorium on mining for the Canyon’s north and south rims. Grand Canyon and the Arizona Trail are pillars of Arizona’s economy, with outdoor recreation generating $21 billion in consumer spending annually, supporting over 200,000 jobs, and sustaining rural communities. The Canyon’s watershed and the Colorado River it feeds provides life-giving water for wildlife, recreationists, and more than 40 million people in the West. “While mining has played an important role in Arizona’s past, the serious long-term risks to public health, water resources, Indigenous people, and recreational activities on public land far outweigh the prospect of short-term profit from uranium production,” said Matthew Nelson, Executive Director of the Arizona Trail Association. “If any of the 800 uranium mining claims on the Kaibab National Forest...
Read More

 


Flickr Photos

Photos from the Arizona Trail Association’s Flickr galleries, for this specific passage. View the entire Flickr account.

[AFG_gallery id=’38’]